Trioceros melleri
Status: Least Concern
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Squamata
Suborder: Iguania
Family: Chamaeleonidae
Genus: Trioceros
Threat: harmless
Venom/Toxin: none
Description: is stout-bodied and has a relatively stubby tail one third the length of its body. It has a sharp medial crest runs from the lizard's eyes to the tip of its snout, which bears a single small horn. The basic coloration of the creature is a deep forest green with white stripes, but like many chameleons it can change its color depending on various circumstances. Their long tongues can reach prey up to 51 cm away.
Tags: chameleon

General Information

The giant one-horned chameleon, is the largest species of chameleon from the African mainland. The Mellers' chameleon is sometimes referred to as the giant one-horned chameleon, because of the small horn that protrudes from the tip of its snout.
Length: up to 76 cm
Weight: up to 600 g
Lifespan: 12 yrs

Ecology and Behaviour

The giant one-horned chameleons live and hunt alone. They are diurnal, or most active during the day.

Diet

The giant one-horned chameleon are carnivores that eat insects, smaller lizards, spiders, crickets, worms, caterpillars and the exceptionally larger ones have been known to eat small birds. Their long tongues can reach prey up to 51 cm away.

Reproduction

Females annually produce a single clutch of up to 80 eggs. Newborn Meller's chameleons are about 10 cm in length and must be fed fruit flies and tiny crickets for the first three weeks of their lives. Afterwards, they accept house flies and larger insect prey including crickets, locusts, silkworms, and cockroaches.

Conservation

It is categorized by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as a, " Least Concern ".
Trend: stable

Distribution and Habitat

The giant one-horned chameleon relatively common in the bushy savannahs and interior mountains of East Africa and may be found in Zambia, Malawi, northern Mozambique, and Tanzania.

Interaction with humans

The giant one-horned chameleon vary from timid to moderately aggressive towards humans, with some specimens being reported as friendly. Due to their size, the species is a desired exotic pet. Their population is currently thought to be stable throughout its range, but over time they could face the risk of being collected in unsustainable numbers.

Featured Listings

No results found.

Related Pages/Posts

Lavushi Manda Skink

Lavushi Manda Skink

Tropical Spiny Agama

Tropical Spiny Agama

Ukinga Hornless Chameleon

Ukinga Hornless Chameleon

Black-lined Plated Lizard

Black-lined Plated Lizard

Okavango Mud Turtle

Okavango Mud Turtle

Nile Crocodile

Nile Crocodile

Cobras & Mambas

Cobras & Mambas