oribi
Ourebia ourebi
Status: Least Concern
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Bovidae
Subfamily: Antilopinae
Genus: Ourebia
Description: They are a small antelope distinguished by the bare black glandular patches below their large oval shaped ears. This antelope features a slightly raised back, and long neck and limbs. The glossy, yellowish to rufous brown coat contrasts with the white chin, throat, underparts and rump. The bushy tail, brown to black on the outside, has white insides

General Information

The oribi is a small antelope that can be found in west, central, east and southern Africa.
Shoulder height: 50–67 cm
Length: 92 -110 cm
Tail Length:
Weight: 12–22 kg
Age:

Fun Facts !

Ecology and Behaviour

They live in small herds of up to 4 members. They are mostly active during the day and sometimes at night. They like to graze on open plains and dambos and have a characteristic ‘stotting’ action when alarmed, jumping into the air with all four legs held stiff and straight. Some experts believe this may be done to give them a better view of approaching predators but it is more likely they are trying to entice the predator to chase and so divert attention from the herd. Unlike other antelopes, they exhibit either polyandry, polygyny or polygynandry type relationships depending on male to female ratio, habitat. They are more of grazzers than browsers as grass types make up 90% of their food.

Conservation

The oribi has been classified as Least Concern by the IUCN Red list.

Distribution and Habitat

Found occasionally in the Luangwa Valley, more often in the Bangweulu Swamps and quite common in Kafue, Liuwa plains and Lochinvar National Parks. The oribi's range overlaps with those of larger grazers such as the African buffalo, hippos, hartebeest, Thomson's gazelle and topi. These separate species often occur in close proximity to each other, increasing predator vigilance

Interaction with humans

Hunting is a relatively minor threat, since the oribi shows some tolerance to hunting. Their numbers have declined due to agricultural expansion and competition from livestock.

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