Papio cynocephalus
Status: Least Concern
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Primates
Suborder: Haplorhini
Family: Cercopithecidae
Genus: Papio
Names: dog headed baboon
Description: Yellow baboons have slim bodies with long arms and legs, and yellowish-brown hair. They resemble the Chacma baboon, but are somewhat smaller and with a less elongated muzzle. Their hairless faces are black, framed with white sideburns.

General Information

The yellow baboon has also been called the dog-headed baboon for obvious reasons. It is widespread and thriving across Zambia
Shoulder height:
Length: up to 84 cm
Tail Length:
Weight:
Age: up to 30 yrs

Fun Facts !

Ecology and Behaviour

Yellow baboons use at least ten different vocalizations to communicate. When traveling as a group, males will lead, females and young stay safely in the middle, and less-dominant males bring up the rear. A baboon group's hierarchy is a serious matter, and some subspecies have developed behaviors intended to avoid confrontation and retaliation. For example, males may use infants as a kind of "passport" or shield for safe approach toward another male. One male will pick up the infant and hold it up as it nears the other male. This action often calms the other male and allows the first male to approach safely

Conservation

The yellow baboon is one of the most successfully thriving primate and is widespread. They do not rank among threatened animal species.

Distribution and Habitat

Yellow baboons inhabit savannas and light forests in southern and eastern Africa. They are diurnal, terrestrial, and live in complex, mixed-gender social groups of 8 to 200 individuals per troop. Like all other baboon species, they are omnivorous, with a preference for fruits; they also eat plants, leaves, seeds, grasses, bulbs, bark, blossoms and fungi, as well as worms, grubs, insects, spiders, scorpions, birds, rodents and small mammals. All species of baboons are highly opportunistic feeders and will eat virtually any food they can find.

Interaction with humans

The baboon’s major predators are humans. Knowing that humans can easily kill or injure them when they are in trees, baboons usually escape through undergrowth. Many troops have become a suburban menace in their search for food, overturning garbage cans, and literally breaking into cars and houses where they cause much damage. These troops can be dangerous and aggressive, and they will even steal food directly from people. These negative encounters have resulted in the baboons being hunted and poisoned by frustrated local residents. A dominant individual (usually the alpha male) leads the group to easily monopolised resources. The group usually follows, even though many subordinate members cannot gain access to that particular resource.

Featured Listings

No results found.

Related Pages/Posts

Southern Roan Antelope

Southern Roan Antelope

African Buffalo

African Buffalo

Bangweulu Tsessebe

Bangweulu Tsessebe

Crawshay’s Defassa waterbuck

Crawshay’s Defassa waterbuck

Lukusuzi National Park

Lukusuzi National Park

Crawshay’s Zebra

Crawshay’s Zebra

Rosevear’s striped grass mouse

Rosevear’s striped grass mouse

Spotted Hyena

Spotted Hyena